Archive for August, 2010

Protocol Alcohol Tester

Posted on August 31st, 2010 by Dario  |  No Comments »

This is protocol alcohol tester gadget measures the quantity of alcohol on your breath, that is done with its oxidized semiconductor which checks blood alcohol content (BAC) in moments. All your required to do is blow inside the sensor for roughly 3 seconds.

This tiny breathalyzer uses a micro-electro mechanical systems, sensors and shows an approximate range of the person’s alcohol level.

The protocol alcohol tester functions:

Assists in the detection of alcohol intoxication
Oxidized semiconductor measures blood alcohol content (BAC) in seconds
FDA approved
Blow onto the sensor for a minimum three seconds and it’ll report if your BAC is low (less than .05%), borderline (.05% on the way to .08%), or lawfully intoxicated (greater than 0.08%)
Precise for at the very least 400 tests or 1 year from the first use
LED light finds keyholes in dark parking lots, streets and garages
Handy timer, counting up or down, better for you to check time on parking meters and garages
Compact alcohol detector is lightweight and sports a keyring for simple transport
Runs on 2 AAA batteries (not included)

Your Rights at DUI Checkpoints

Posted on August 30th, 2010 by Dario  |  1 Comment »

imageMany people on the road today do not understand their rights pertaining to DUI checkpoints. These rights become increasingly important if you’ve had a few drinks, and aren’t sure if it will register on a breathalyzer. To avoid incriminating yourself, there are some things you need to know about sobriety checkpoints before you find yourself being stopped at a temporary roadblock set up to catch drunk drivers.

DUI or Sobriety checkpoints are temporary checkpoints used by law enforcement officers to catch drunk drivers. In 1990, The United States Supreme Court ruled that sobriety checkpoints are not a violation of citizens’ right to privacy, however, that doesn’t mean they are effective. Chief Justice Stevens stated that “the net effect of sobriety checkpoints on traffic is infinitesimal and possibly negative.” In fact, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration has concluded that roving patrols by law enforcement officers result in three times more arrests than checkpoints. Although controversial, DUI or sobriety checkpoints do work to show the public that driving under the influence is bad.

So what do you do when you come upon a Driving Under the Influence (DUI) or Sobriety checkpoint?

The first thing to do is show the officer your identification when asked. If they begin asking you questions, politely decline to answer as is your right. If you answer some questions, but not others, you will only raise suspicion and encourage the law enforcement officer to investigate or question you further. If the officer asks to search you car, respond by telling them that you do not consent to any searches. If you are ordered out of your car by the officer it is important that you lock the doors behind you.

In the event that the officer suspects you of drinking or being under the influence of alcohol, you will be asked to perform a field sobriety test or breathalyzer test. You DO have the right to decline the test and request to speak with an attorney. This will probably result in your arrest, and the officer will put you in contact with an attorney. When you get to station, request again to speak with an attorney before submitting to any other tests or questions; the attorney you speak to will become a witness to your behavior, noting the clarity of your speech and instructing you on the legal issues involved in your current situation.

Your next move while at the station should be to submit to a BAC or Blood Alcohol Test. You are required by law to submit to a chemical test at the police station. If you refuse the test, your license could be revoked or suspended. It is usually better to submit to a test and then have the results suppressed than to refuse, as the penalty can be just as harsh as a DUI. Breathalyzer tests are more unreliable than blood tests, so if given the option, choose the breathalyzer. Knowing your rights is the most important thing you can do to protect your civil liberties during a DUI arrest.

What Police Can And Can't Do

Posted on August 27th, 2010 by Dario  |  No Comments »

imageDUI is driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs and therefore, it is definitely a serious offence. Police are very strict on those who are suspected with DUI and if they wish they can stop anybody and question about the influence. In Los Angeles and the other parts of the State, many such incidents take place almost everyday. It is never recommended that one may drink and drive as it is dangerous not just for the person who is driving the vehicle, but also for the others. If the DUI charge against a person is established, he/she can get harsh punishments like jail, steep fine, high insurance premiums, etc.. Moreover, if the name of the person gets listed on the DUI record, then it is very bad for the track record of that person. Therefore, one should never think of drinking and driving intentionally. However, there are possibilities that because of a certain unforeseen situation, you have to drive under the influence and unfortunately you get pulled over by the police. In such situation, you must know what the police can do and cannot do in a DUI case. Here, a few instances of the role of police in a DUI case are mentioned.

Protocol Alcohol Breath Tester

Posted on August 25th, 2010 by Dario  |  No Comments »

The protocol alcohol breath tester device calculates the amount of alcohol through your breath, this is done with its oxidized semiconductor which checks blood alcohol content (BAC) in seconds. All you have to do is blow on the sensor for roughly three seconds. This tiny breathalyzer uses a micro-electro mechanical systems, sensors and displays an approximate range of the person’s alcohol level.

Features on the protocol alcohol breath tester:

Aids in detection of alcohol excess
Oxidized semiconductor measures blood alcohol content (BAC) within seconds
Blow against the sensor for no less than 3 seconds and it will convey if your BAC is low (less than .05%), borderline (.05% to .08%), otherwise lawfully intoxicated (greater than 0.08%)
LED light finds keyholes in dark parking lots, streets as well as garages
Convenient timer, counting up or down, great to measure time on parking meters and garages
Compact alcohol tester is lightweight and sports a keyring for convenient transport
Runs on 2 AAA batteries (not incorporated)
Measures the total amount of alcohol on your breath
FDA approved

Reasons and Signs of Teenage Drug Abuse Do they need a Drug and Alcohol Tester

Posted on August 23rd, 2010 by Dario  |  No Comments »

imageTeenage drug addiction is a severe problem that could not be controlled successfully. A common definition of addiction is, “The uncontrollable and compulsive use of mind-altering drugs/substances, even though having the knowledge of the fact that such use may cause problems with one’s life”. Addiction can be physical and/or psychological dependence on a chemical substance. Is there a need for drug and Alcohol tester for your teenager?
 
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